Posted in Doctrine and Covenants, Gospel Doctrine 2017

Gospel Doctrine 2017 -Lesson 10: “This Is My Voice unto All”

1. Husbands and wives should support and comfort each other.

D&C 25:5 Consoling words

‘There is so much of argument in the homes of the people. It is so destructive. It is so corrosive. It leads only to bitterness, heartbreak, and tears. How well advised we would be, each of us, when there is tension, when there is friction, when there is affliction, to speak with consoling words in the spirit of meekness. ‘ (Gordon B Hinckley, “If Thou Art Faithful,” Ensign, Nov. 1984, 91)

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D&C 25:14 Spirit of meekness

“Let us continue to live in humility and meekness before God, seeking in faith and good works to get an increased portion of his Holy Spirit, that we may comprehend the laws of God and live according to the principles of eternal truth….” (John Taylor, JD, 18:334-335, December 31, 1876)

2. We should be meek and avoid pride.

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D&C 23:1 Beware of pride

‘Three times in the Doctrine and Covenants the Lord uses the phrase “beware of pride,” including a warning to the second elder of the Church, Oliver Cowdery, and to Emma Smith, the wife of the Prophet. (D&C 23:1; see also D&C 25:14; D&C 38:39.)

Pride is a very misunderstood sin, and many are sinning in ignorance. (See Mosiah 3:11; 3 Ne. 6:18.) In the scriptures there is no such thing as righteous pride-it is always considered a sin. Therefore, no matter how the world uses the term, we must understand how God uses the term so we can understand the language of holy writ and profit thereby. (See 2 Ne. 4:15; Mosiah 1:3-7; Alma 5:61.)

Most of us think of pride as self-centeredness, conceit, boastfulness, arrogance, or haughtiness. All of these are elements of the sin, but the heart, or core, is still missing.

The central feature of pride is enmity-enmity toward God and enmity toward our fellowmen. Enmity means “hatred toward, hostility to, or a state of opposition.” It is the power by which Satan wishes to reign over us.

Pride is essentially competitive in nature. We pit our will against God’s. When we direct our pride toward God, it is in the spirit of “my will and not thine be done.” As Paul said, they “seek their own, not the things which are Jesus Christ’s.” (Philip. 2:21.)

Our will in competition to God’s will allows desires, appetites, and passions to go unbridled.

The proud cannot accept the authority of God giving direction to their lives. (See Hel. 12:6.) They pit their perceptions of truth against God’s great knowledge, their abilities versus God’s priesthood power, their accomplishments against His mighty works.’ (Ezra Taft Benson, “Beware of Pride,” Ensign, May 1989, 4)

D&C 38:39 Beware of pride

‘Let us note that, although the Lord can bestow on us ‘the riches of the earth,’ the riches he most wants to bless us with are ‘the riches of eternity.’ As he counsels elsewhere, ‘Seek not for riches, but for wisdom, and behold, the mysteries of God shall be unfolded unto you, and then shall you be made rich. Behold, he that hath eternal life is rich.’ (D&C 6:7.)

“One of the problems with material wealth is that it sometimes corrupts those who have it. It is for this reason that the Lord’s promise of riches in section 38 cited above ends with the warning: ‘But beware of pride, lest ye become as the Nephites of old.’ (D&C 38:39.)

“If we set our minds on the ‘treasures of earth’ rather than on the things of eternity, we will lose our spirituality and begin to rely on our own wisdom. Indeed, it was the Nephites’ pride and lust for riches and their failure to dedicate their blessings to the Lord’s work that stirred Jacob to condemn them for failing to ‘think of [their] brethren like unto [them]selves’ and for not being ‘familiar with all and free with [their] substance.’ (Jacob 2:17.)” (Alan Webster, “I Have a Question,” Ensign, Apr. 1990, 52-53)

“Some fall victim to greed when they think that the Lord and his church are failing them economically. Paul describes the result in his love-of-money passage: ‘They have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.’ (1 Tim. 6:10.)

“… Our greed begins when we think more about what God owes us than what we owe him. The Lord has promised the faithful the ‘riches of eternity.’ We should be content with that promise and serve for the joy of serving.” ‘(Richard Tice, “Greed: When Enough Is Not Enough,” Ensign, June 1989, 34)

D&C 90:17 Be admonished

‘Although this counsel is valuable to all members of the Church, it was perhaps especially significant for Sidney Rigdon and Frederick G. Williams, who both later opposed the Prophet and left the Church, though Frederick G. Williams eventually returned.’ (D&C Institute Manual)

D&C 98:19 I, the Lord, am not well pleased

‘On the 11th of December (1836), the Prophet sharply rebuked the Kirtland Saints for their sins and backsliding. He warned them to repent, lest judgment should come upon them as it had come upon the Saints in Jackson County, Missouri. Those were trying times. They were days of separation when it became necessary to separate the unworthy from those who were of the household of faith. Kirtland was not to be the abiding place of the Saints. They must give up their possessions and their love for the city they had striven so hard to adorn.’ (Wilford Woodruff, His Life and Labors, comp. Matthias F. Cowley [Salt Lake City: Deseret News, 1916], 65 – 66)

D&C 1:28 They were humble

‘Elder Bruce R. McConkie taught us that “all progress in spiritual things is conditioned upon the prior attainment of humility.1 [Mormon Doctrine, 2nd ed. (1966), 370.] Humility has been described as having the “desire to submit to the Lord,” the “desire to seek the Lord’s will and glory,” and the “desire to remove pride.”2 [Gospel Principles (1997), 4.] King Benjamin told his people that they should “always retain in remembrance, the greatness of God, and your own nothingness, and his goodness and long-suffering towards you, unworthy creatures, and humble yourselves even in the depths of humility”  Mosiah 4:11 The Lord counseled in the Doctrine and Covenants that “inasmuch as they were humble they might be made strong, and blessed from on high, and receive knowledge from time to time”  D&C 1:28

May we each develop our humility by submitting to the will of the Lord in all things so that we may retain a remission of our sins.'(Keith Crockett, General Conference, October 2000)

D&C 19:23 Learn of me, and listen to my words

‘These words give me the feeling of such closeness to, such intimacy with the Savior, looking at him, listening to him, learning from him, walking with him, and feeling his peace like his very arms around me. Within each of us is an intense hunger for this intimacy with and closeness to him. I think we all want to feel his spirit around us.’ (Chieko N Okazaki, Lighten Up! [Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1993], 199.)

D&C 112:10 Be thou humble

‘I believe, brothers and sisters, that only those who are humble are able to acknowledge and understand the Lord’s answers to their prayers. The humble are teachable, recognizing how dependent they are on God and desiring to be subject to His will. The humble are meek and have the ability to influence others to be the same. God’s promise to the humble is that He will lead them by the hand. I truly believe that we will avoid detours and sadness in our lives as long as we walk hand in hand with the Lord.’ (Ulisses Soares, General Conference, October 2013)

3. We should rejoice and be of good cheer.

D&C 29:5 Your advocate with the Father

‘Jesus Christ came upon the scene as the Mediator between man and God, and the Advocate for man with the Father. He pleads our cause. As our Mediator, through his ministry, he labors to reconcile us, to bring us into agreement with God his Father.

An advocate is one who defends or pleads for or in behalf of another. A mediator is one who reconciles or brings about agreement between parties.

That is part of his great mission. He stands between the Father and man. When he was upon earth, he prayed frequently for his disciples, pleading with his Father in their behalf, and he has been pleading ever since, and he stands between us and God our Father.’  (Joseph Fielding Smith, Doctrines of Salvation, 3 vols., edited by Bruce R. McConkie [Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1954-1956], 1: 26.)

D&C 6:36 Be of good cheer

‘If we by nature are not happy, something is wrong with us. We ought to find out what it is and correct it as soon as possible, because until we do, we will not enjoy the Spirit with us as much as if we were of good cheer. Developing an attitude of gratitude for our many blessings can be a giant step forward in fostering happiness.’ (Joe J Christensen, “Toward Greater Spirituality: Ten Important Steps,” Ensign, June 1983,9)

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D&C 68:6 I the Lord am with you

‘You are not alone on this journey. Your Heavenly Father knows you. Even when no one else hears you, He hears you. When you rejoice in righteousness, He rejoices with you. When you are beset with trial, He grieves with you.

Heavenly Father’s interest in you does not depend on how rich or beautiful or healthy or smart you are. He sees you not as the world sees you; He sees who you really are. He looks on your heart. [See  1 Samuel 16:7 And He loves you [See  1 Peter 5:6–7 because you are His child.

Dear sisters, seek Him earnestly, and you will find Him. [See  Jeremiah 29:13

I promise you, you are not alone.’ (Dieter F Uchtdorf, General Conference, April 2013)

D&C 78:18 I will lead you along

‘Brothers and sisters, it is my testimony to the Church that the Lord will lead us along, just as promised. He balances giving to the Church and its people the needed, specific directions, with providing the relevant learning experiences, including having our faith and patience tried in order to be strengthened. Thus He leads us along, but He desires that during that process we take His yoke upon us in order to learn of Him by our personal experiences. We surely feel the weight of that yoke at times, but the path is clear.

Jesus, our Shepherd, has “marked the path and led the way, And ev’ry point defines” (Hymns, 1985, no. 195). His clearly defined footprints are easy to see. They are pressed distinctly and deeply into the soil of the second estate, deeply and distinctly because of the enormous weight which pressed down upon Him, including the awful burden of all of our individual sins.’  (Neal A Maxwell, “For I Will Lead You Along,” Ensign, May 1988, 9)

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